Christians Don’t Have to Run

Wherefore it is contained in the Scripture, Behold, I lay in Sion a Chief Corner Stone, elect, precious, and he that believeth on Him shall not be confounded.

1 Peter 2:6

Note: This was originally published on my previous blog July 16, 2013

Peter wrote these words to suffering, persecuted believers of the early Church, at a time when Christians were hunted down by both religious leaders and government officials, and tortured and killed. He reminded them in his letter that their inheritance was safely preserved in heaven for them (1 Peter 1:3-5), that they were a chosen people with special privileges, and that their confidence in the Lord was well-founded and sure (2:4-10). He loosely quoted this Scripture from the writings of the prophet Isaiah:

Isa 28:16 Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD, Behold, I lay in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation: he that believeth shall not make haste.

After reading that verse (in Isaiah) in its context one morning while studying 1 Peter 2:6, I sat stumped for a few moments. It seemed worlds away from that of 1 Peter 2. Two different time periods, two different contexts, two different audiences. How did it fit and what did it mean? And to make it more confusing, Peter’s quotation was not taken from Isaiah word for word: “confounded,” and “make haste,” seemed to be very different.

But slowly the pieces of the puzzle came together.

Looking into the Isaiah passage, it becomes clear that the context concerns God promising to send judgment for sin. Ephraim (Isaiah 28:1) had turned from God, was walking in rebellion, and the people were reassuring their troubled consciences by telling themselves that death could not overtake them—they had made a pact with hell (28:14-15). They could sin and there would be no judgment. No recompense. No accountability. No consequences. Lies were their refuge, and they denied reality with falsehood.

Now God comes to them with a very stern and grim warning: “Because you trust in lies, I’m going to lay a stone in Zion, and only those who believe will not make haste. I’m bringing my judgment and righteousness, and your lies are going to be washed away, your covenant with death disannulled, and you’re going to get the judgment you so rightly deserve but thought you could escape.” In fact, God goes on to say that judgment has been determined “upon the whole earth,” not just Ephraim to whom He’s speaking in this passage (28:16-22).

So there was God’s promise to send wrath and just retribution. But in this warning, He has also left a prophetic ray of hope. In the face of man’s sin, lies, and unrepentance, God is going to lay a chosen stone in Zion, upon which if a man believes, he will not “make haste.”

Make haste? To what would people be hurrying to…or from?

Again, the context would suggest the answer: when God’s judgment begins to fall, men will be “making haste” to flee it. God said He would bring “hail” to sweep away their lies, and “waters” to overflow their hiding place—and when the “overflowing scourge” passes through, they would be trodden down and taken by it (verses 18-19).

As a startling illustration of this, the people of Noah’s day come to mind. Noah preached to them for a hundred years, and yet they did not repent. Then one day Noah entered the ark, God sealed it up, and the opportunity for repentance was past. I imagine a scene in which terrified people are watching the rain descend, the fountains of the deep burst open, and the waters rush up on land towards them. Screaming, they rush in all directions, trying to clamor onto roofs, or climb trees, or run for the hills. They “make haste” but are overtaken and drowned in the flood waters of God’s wrath and judgment.

So if those who don’t believe on God’s chosen Corner Stone make haste, what do those who do believe do?

Here’s where it gets good.

In the Greek in 1 Peter, “believeth” means “to have faith, credit, to entrust.” In Hebrew the word can mean “to build up or support, to render or be firm or faithful, to trust or believe, to be permanent or quiet, to be true, to go to the right hand—hence assurance.” The word is used of Abraham in Genesis 15:6 when he believed the Lord and it was reckoned to him for righteousness. The idea is that a man puts his trust and faith in the Lord—he builds his life upon the Rock, Jesus Christ—and stands, immovable, in quiet rest. His position is permanent, despite anything that comes…because his Foundation is founded and permanently settled by God the Father Himself.

Faith is rest. It is resting from the works of the law, from fear of death and judgment, etc., and entrusting one’s soul to the Father through the finished work of His Son on the cross. It is literally standing on the Rock. Matthew 7 presents a good picture of this. Those who build their lives on Christ will not be swept away in the storm of judgment. Those trusting in anything other than Him will be destroyed when it comes. Sinners will not be able to stand in the judgment (Psalm 1), but the righteous will (Jude 1:24). Anyone found standing on the Chief Corner Stone that God has laid, rather than the sand of lies and self-deception, will not be washed away with other sinners in the judgment.

You could say that the opposite of making haste—hurrying to or from one place or another—would be to be still…to be at rest…to be quiet. Christ is our Sabbath Rest (Hebrews 4). The Greek word in 1 Peter translated “lay” is “tithemi,” meaning “to place (in the widest application literally and figuratively; properly in a passive or horizontal posture, and thus different from [histemi] which properly denotes an upright and active position, while [keimai] is properly reflexive and utterly prostrate).”

The Stone upon which we have chosen to build our lives is fixed, passive, securely resting and immovable. All who stand upon it are “safe and secure from all alarm” as the old hymn says. Never, never, will those who put their faith in Jesus be ashamed (Romans 10:11). In that verse in 1 Peter a double negative is used in that “shall not” be confounded.

In the day of judgment we will not be confounded—we will not find that our hope has disappointed us. We won’t find ourselves cast off and rejected and put to shame for believing in Christ. We will not make haste—we will not try to flee from the wrath of God when it descends, because it will not touch those found in Christ.

Only those who reject the Stone which God laid will in turn be rejected and consumed. When the floodgates of God’s wrath and judgment are one day unleashed upon the entire earth, not one of those who believed on Him will be washed away, trodden down, lost, or destroyed.

He that dwelleth in the secret place of the most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. I will say of the LORD, He is my refuge and my fortress: my God; in him will I trust…He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his wings shalt thou trust: his truth shall be thy shield and buckler. Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night; nor for the arrow that flieth by day; Nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness; nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday. A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee. Only with thine eyes shalt thou behold and see the reward of the wicked. Because thou hast made the LORD, which is my refuge, even the most High, thy habitation; There shall no evil befall thee, neither shall any plague come nigh thy dwelling…Because he hath set his love upon me, therefore will I deliver him: I will set him on high, because he hath known my name…” (Psalm 91)

Psalm 91 takes on a whole new meaning in this light. If God is our habitation, our dwelling, His Son the Chief Corner Stone of our foundation, then when the judgment comes, and “ten thousand fall” to our left and right, it shall not approach us, because we have made Him our refuge.

 * * * * * *

These must have been encouraging words for the persecuted believers in Peter’s day to hear. They were not suffering in vain. Their hope was not in vain (1 Corinthians 15). They would receive the crown of life for choosing Christ—even if it meant they were to be tortured and killed for their testimony. Their foundation stood sure—how else could they have the courage to live and die? They might, for a time, be chased all over the face of the earth by evil men…but they would not be running in the day of God’s judgment. They were promised that in this life nothing could separate them from the love of Christ (Romans 8). He would never leave them nor forsake them (Hebrews 13:6).

In Isaiah 28 the verse is addressed to those in sin, warning them to repent. In 1 Peter 2 it is addressed to believers, assuring them that they have a foundation, and, by implication, that those who are now persecuting them will be judged for rejecting the Stone of God. In both contexts, safety, peace, and eternal hope are promised to those who trust in the Chief Corner Stone.

What do we say to all this? Unto us “which believe He is precious” (1 Peter 2:7).

If the Stone is under your feet, you’re good to go. Bank on it. And rest.

 

Author: tabithafaye85

I'm a book addict, a nature lover, a Christian wife and mom, and an INTJ. :)

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