School Curriculum Part 3: Reading and Language Arts

Here’s what we’re using for phonics/reading, grammar, and spelling.  🙂

Phonics/Reading 20180314_155054

We use Phonics Pathways for our core reading program. This is an all-in-one, kindergarten through second grade program-in-a-book. While Marcus is just starting in it Bri is hurrying to finish it up. It also includes simple games (which both of my kids thought were a lot of fun). It’s not divided up into specific lessons; instead you move at the child’s own pace, whether that means completing half a page or two pages/day. There’s a lot of helpful instruction for the parent as well.

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For reading, I have used the Amish Pathway readers with Brianna (Marcus isn’t ready for them yet). Bri started out in the 2nd grade readers this year and zoomed through all of those, then completed the 3rd grade readers as well, so that she has now graduated to other chapter books. She reads a chapter in her Bible each day and has started on the Boxcar Children series.

A site we’ve used for reading and phonics fun is Starfall. I never paid for the full version, but we’ve just used what was available on the free version for a little extra math and reading fun. 🙂

Grammar 20180314_155050

 First Language Lessons for the Well-Trained Mind takes a Classical/Charlotte Mason approach to language study. I think one of the best words to describe the approach used here is “gentle.” Copywork, dictation, poetry memorization, story readings and discussions—as well as the technical side of learning parts of speech, diagramming, etc.—all play an integral part in this language program. Each lesson is scripted for the teacher which makes it very easy to use (books 1 and 2 contain 100 lessons each). Lesson time will vary from child to child, but we probably spend about 10-15 minutes a day with it on average (minus copywork time). Although Marcus isn’t technically at the grammar level of study in these books, he memorizes the poems with Bri. 20180314_155349

It’s easy to teach, easy to use, and we plan to work our way through the whole series of four books.

Spelling

We’ve started with a program called Spelling You See. I love, love, love everything about this program…okay, except for the price tag. It is a little pricey (as in $40+ to $50+ per grade level), but I use these consumable/non-reproducible books in a way that will make them last through every child who will use them, so I feel like the cost is at least somewhat justified (I’ll explain in a minute). 20180314_155457

Copywork and dictation are the foundation of this course. However, its real strength and unique quality lies in its highly visual approach to learning. No tests are ever given or required (though you can do this for your child yourself if you feel it’s a must).

Bri started out in Level B this school year (technically about a first grade level) and it includes two student workbooks, a handwriting chart, and the instructor’s handbook. The books contain 18 lessons each for a total of 36 weeks’ worth of lessons. In the first book, she practiced copying a new poem each week (so in Lesson 1 she copied part of “Jack and Jill” every day for a week). Then she practiced tracing letters and/or writing some words from dictation (week 1 included 3, three-letter words, but towards the end of the first book she was writing up to 15 words/day from dictation, and words with up to 5 letters each). 

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The second student workbook is where she began to really get into the core of the program: color “chunking.” As with the first book, she copies a poem each week. But first, she reads the poem, then gets out her crayons and “chunks” it (we use dry erase crayons on a sheet protector into which we slip her page for the day, so it’s erasable and reusable).  20180314_155728 

Yellow is used for “vowel chunks.” Purple for “bossy R chunks.” Blue for “consonant chunks.” Pink for “endings” (like ed, es, ful, ing, ly, etc.) And so on (initially, only a couple of colors are used as children get practice with the concept). By color coding each of these “chunks” in her poem each day, she is creating a visual memory of the words. The reason this becomes so important (especially later on) is because many English words are not phonetically spelled, and cannot simply be “sounded out.”

So after she “chunks” her poem, she copies part of it (in a separate notebook; I don’t let her write in the student workbook). She then chunks the poem (this time handwritten) a second time before finishing up her lesson. She is then to read what she has written. 

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So read, chunk, copy, chunk, read. That’s the order. Then at the end of each week instead of copying her poem, she writes it in its entirety from dictation/memory.

I can see the program helping her already. When I’m dictating a word in her poem I’ll ask, “What vowel chunk (or what bossy r chunk) did you color in this word?” The light will go on and she’ll be like, “Oh, I colored ‘ou’ in ‘spout’”; or “Oh yeah, I colored the bossy r chunk ‘ar’ in ‘cupboard.’” 20180314_095612

She’s usually able to complete a lesson in 15 minutes or so, depending on how much she piddles. 😉 And most of her lesson can be completed independently, so there’s very little teacher time involved and practically zero prep time with this course (after the 1st book of Level B, that is).

It’s a win-win for Mom! 😉

Author: tabithafaye85

I'm a book addict, a nature lover, a Christian wife and mom, and an INTJ. :)

2 thoughts on “School Curriculum Part 3: Reading and Language Arts”

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