Christian Non-fiction Read in 2019

Part 3 of my series of posts with micro-reviews of books read in 2019. Part 1 here, Part 2 here.

Run Today’s Race by Oswald Chambers. This small book, consisting of pithy sayings or “seed thoughts” (as Chambers liked to call them), was compiled by his family after his death. There is one such thought for each day of the calendar year; you could think of this as My Utmost for His HighestLite.”

August 20

There is nothing so secure as the salvation of God; it is as eternal as the mountains, and it is our trust in God that brings us the conscious realisation of this.

Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God by Jonathan Edwards. Edwards’ fiery sermon, delivered in a calm, monotone voice and resulting in many conversions and a great revival in a church that had previously been dead to God and His Word, is the most famous sermon ever preached on American soil. He didn’t mince words as he warned men to flee from the wrath to come—and fly to the arms of Christ, open in mercy. I had assigned this booklet to Brianna for reading, so I read it too. 😉

Your wickedness makes you as heavy as lead; it drives you down, with great weight and pressure, toward hell. And if God were to let you go, you would immediately sink and swiftly descend and plunge into the bottomless gulf. At that moment, you will see that your health, your own care and prudence, your best contrivance, and all your righteousness, have no more influence to uphold you and keep you out of hell, than a spider’s web has to stop a falling rock.

Alone in Majesty: The Attributes of a Holy God by William MacDonald. Short, worshipful and thought-provoking chapters explore different attributes of God’s character—both unique, and shared. Includes study guide. I used this during my morning prayer times.

How grateful we should be that God has given us minds that are able to consider His knowledge, holiness, love, power, and wisdom. True, we see through a glass darkly. But never mind! It is still a tremendous privilege to stretch our minds to the limit in contemplating His divine attributes.

What is the Gospel? by Greg Gilbert. In eight concise little chapters, Gilbert defines and explains the gospel. It’s a good read for the Christian, and also an excellent evangelistic tool. In a nutshell, he sums up the gospel in this way:

We are accountable to the God who created us. We have sinned against that God and will be judged. But God has acted in Jesus Christ to save us, and we take hold of that salvation by repentance from sin and faith in Jesus.

God. Man. Christ. Response.

Christ Loved the Church by William MacDonald. My husband really liked this book and asked me to read it. Barely over a 100 pages, it deals with the teachings of the epistles on the body of Christ—who it is comprised of, its functions, leadership, unity, purpose, ordinances, etc. MacDonald encourages us to pursue love and unity as we seek to restore the simplicity of the church gathering.

“Christ also loved the church and gave Himself for her,” (Eph. 5:25). We, too, should love the church…We should sacrificially and devotedly give ourselves in loving, glad service in order that the church on earth might progress, prosper and triumph.

Author: tabithafaye85

I'm a book addict, a nature lover, a Christian wife and mom, and an INTJ. :)

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