“Art of Homeschooling” Part 1

I stumbled across some notes I had made from Mystie Winckler’s “Art of Homeschooling” course last year while searching for something else the other day. I read them again, and was again reminded of areas of personal growth that I need to persevere in.

Mystie’s course helped me pinpoint and troubleshoot “problem” areas in my life and our school/family life. Her questions were penetrating and her insights illuminating. I would definitely recommend her course! (She conducts the online 5-week course periodically.)

Presented here as abbreviated, edited, reorganized, and otherwise condensed notes, I made these for myself during my brainstorm sessions while working through Mystie’s assignments/reading material. The goals I identified are still that—worthy goals I want to work on, but am far from having consistently attained. 🙂

* * *

Fostering a Love of Learning

I love to learn. I am curious about many things. I spend hours reading, researching, and trying new skills and projects. While teaching school I will sometimes get curious and interested in something and pursue rabbit trails trying to learn more about it. After hours I work on new skills and gaining new knowledge.

My problem is not that I do not model a love of learning. My problem is that I become impatient and ignore the kids when I’m wanting to get my work done precisely so I may pursue my many interests. In such times I selfishly fail to foster their curiosity, questioning, and interest because it’s not convenient for me.

GOALS:

When I notice that they are taking a delight and interest in something, I need to encourage it. To get excited with them. To ask questions together.
When they ask me all their “why?” questions, I will try not to shut them down, but instead listen, engage, and encourage further independent research. I don’t need to have all the answers to their questions. I do need to encourage them to keep looking for answers, and not throw water on their fire of curiosity with hasty, blank dismissals.

If I am truly busy and truly cannot help, I can either suggest we talk about it at a more opportune time, or give them some materials they can use to start researching independently. If I am busy but simply not wanting to be helpful because I’m in a hurry, I need to repent, give a thoughtful reply and/or encourage them to research.

I need to take the time to teach them skills. When Marcus wants to crack an egg. When Bri wants to tie her shoe. When Marcus wants to know how to spell a word. When Bri wants to help cook dinner.

When we go places and as we go about our work for the day, I try to notice more and help them notice more and tie it into whatever we are learning. We wonder. We ask questions.

When possible/appropriate I should include them in my interests and let them help/watch me.

Modeling (and Requiring) Diligence

My biggest temptation toward laziness during the day is to “cop out” for awhile and browse social media. The kids’ biggest temptation during our mornings is to grumble and complain about their schoolwork and chores.

GOALS:

Limit my time on social media and the internet in general. Do not look at my phone when the children are up/around except for necessary uses or quick checks (responding to certain texts, phone calls, calculator/bills, library orders, other orders, etc.). Spend more of my time in the afternoon on profitable things like reading and writing rather than internet browsing.

Guide the children into paths of faithfulness:

• Scriptural admonition (obedience/diligence/doing all we do for the glory of God)

• Common sense reasoning/big picture perspective (sound mind)

• Teach them to learn to enjoy work

• Fun has its place, but cannot usurp more important things

• Helping them recognize there are rewards to work (reaping and sowing)

• Delayed gratification

• Community/Family/Household dynamics (everyone is needed; we must all work together)

• Projects to encourage them to see and believe truth. Eventually they can keep Heart Journals, do word/Bible studies, etc.

• Discipline/Correction for whining, complaining, and laziness when appropriate

• Modeling faithfulness myself by not grumbling about my own responsibilities, and seeking repentance before God and them when I do.

• Being a present and loving mom. I need to give them my full attention when they are speaking to me or we are doing something together, to communicate that I love each one, to show no favoritism or partiality, and to spend time with them beyond school and chores.

Dealing with Irritations and Bad Attitudes

I am most likely to get irritable or shut down when I feel like my responsibilities just keep piling on me and I can’t complete them in my goal time. This is even more pronounced when the kids are whiny, rowdy, or needy simultaneously. Sometimes I complain when I’m tired.

GOALS:

When tempted to be irritable or complain I need to step back and assess things:

• Am I doing what I need to be doing RIGHT now?

• Can some things wait?

• Do other things need priority?

• Is everything on my agenda for the day even necessary?

• Is it possible to multi-task on some hings, get the kids’ help, etc.? (Work smarter and not harder?)

• Am I practicing good stewardship of my body? (Getting enough sleep and eating well so I don’t become moody/emotional?)

If everything absolutely must be done and I am still overwhelmed at the moment, I can back off, go into the bedroom for a few moments, pray, realign my focus, ask for grace, and consider the big picture.

When I feel the conviction of the Spirit, I can turn my heart to obedience rather than stubborness by taking a moment away. Acknowledge the struggle. Seek repentance before the Lord if I have complained or become irritable/angry (and before my children if needed). Go outside. Take a few moments for giving thanks.

If the kids’ attitudes and behaviors need tending to, I can first readjust mine, then help them with theirs. If I am unable to do that immediately I can send them off to do something for a little bit so I can regain composure and good attitude before trying to deal with theirs. It would be better to deal with their issues “late” than to deal with them in the heat of the moment while angry. Send them to complete a responsibility or to room but do not try to address the issues while I am angry.

I can help my children when they feel stubborn and want their own way by helping them to stop and see the big picture. By reminding them of truth. By helping them see that the good is desirable and right, and evil comes with consequences. I can give them time and space to think. To freely make a choice of obedience. When they fail to I can administer discipline if it is truly required.

Remember to determine if there may be underlying causes to the complaining that may need addressed first: Are they tired? Hungry? Not feeling well? Truly overwhelmed? Deal with each of these issues first.

Continued here

No, Death is Not Beautiful

It was 4:00 in the morning. The phone call and recorded message jerked me awake. I shook Cliff.

“Your mom says your dad fell out of his chair and needs help getting back up.”

Cliff stumbled out of bed and sleepily put some clothes on. A few moments later he headed across the yard to his parents’ house with flashlight in hand.

Too awake now to fall asleep again immediately, I got up and sat on the couch waiting for him to come home.

Then I heard the sirens.

Hurrying to the window, I saw the lights flashing in my in-laws’ driveway. The first vehicle was joined by two more.

It seemed an eternity before I finally saw Cliff coming toward the house again. I met him at the back door…and knew the news was not good.

He was stooped as though having a difficult time breathing, heaving in deeply with tears pouring down his cheeks as raw, visceral emotion was released.

“I think he’s gone.”

We held one another and cried.

* * * * *

Our kids were blessed to live so near Papa they got to see him almost every day. They have some wonderful memories to treasure. Papa would bring Brianna home from work (Daddy sometimes takes her with him in the mornings) and he would always stop at Braums first to get her an ice cream cone. He taught her to play checkers. He sat with the kids this last 4th of July as they squeeled at the sight and sound of the fireworks. If they were involved in a play or presentation with the homeschool group, he was there.  Many times I would look out the window to be greeted by the sight of my son or daughter working alongside their papa in the yard or garden—hauling brush or sticks, cleaning up this or that, carrying firewood to the house.

Despite his failing health, Dad stayed active and industrious. I’ve never seen such a work ethic.  Rain or shine, good health or poor, Dad never let any excuse keep him from working hard and beiproductive. He instilled this strong work ethic and a sense of integrity in all four of his children. As his health failed he never complained about anything. But he had never been a complainer, simply
taking life as it came.

He was a man of few words, believing actions spoke louder. Accordingly, he was well-reputed for his generous support of Christian ministries and missions around the world. He usually had his Bible laid open on his desk where he had been reading it. He loved sitting in his chair, listening to great hymns of the faith, or preaching and teaching.

He had been listening to the preaching of J. Vernon McGee when he passed away.

* * * * *

At 6:30 that morning, our kids (aged 7 and 6) awoke. I wasn’t sure exactly how they would take the news. We sat down with them on the couch and broke it to them as gently as possible. I was surprised that they both took it without any show of emotion. I think they were in some shock and did not grasp the reality of it at the time. But later in the day Bri walked off by herself and cried. The next morning my sister-in-law saw Marcus sitting in a chair, staring at a picture of him and his grandpa together. When she asked him if he was okay he burst into tears, buried his face in the picture, and sobbed his heart out.

The funeral was delayed for a week because one of Cliff’s sisters and her husband were already scheduled to adopt a girl from an orphanage in Bulgaria. Just two days after they all arrived back in the States, we laid Dad’s body to rest. What made it poignantly painful and beautiful at once was to
observe the cycle of life: just as a family member left this world, another was added to the family, and yet another will soon enter (child #3 is due in just a few weeks!).

Death is not a beautiful thing. It’s wrong. Horribly wrong. In trying to come to terms with it the modern consciousness has tried to accept and embrace it as a “normal” and “beautiful” part of life.

But there is nothing inherently normal or good or beautiful about growing old and dying. In view of all life declared “good” in the Garden, it should not be. It is part of the curse that sinful man brought on himself. Death entered through the first Adam.

But the believer finds hope and reason to rejoice—even in death—because Life has come through the Second Adam.

Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned…(…For if by one man’s offence death reigned by one; much more they which receive abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness shall reign in life by one, Jesus Christ.) Therefore as by the offence of one judgment came upon all men to condemnation; even so by the righteousness of one the free gift came upon all men unto justification of life. For as by one man’s disobedience many were made sinners, so by the obedience of one shall many be made righteous.

Romans 6:12, 17-19

As believers, we sorrow when our loved ones pass on. But we don’t sorrow in the same way as those who have no hope (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18). Christ has triumphed over death—it is described
as an enemy He will destroy at the last (1 Corinthians 15:26). Those who believe in Christ and trust Him for their righteousness have everlasting life. And when believers die they are simply shedding the shell of death which is under the curse and exchanging it for life.

In our morning devotions together the kids and I had just started into The Attributes of God for Kids about a week and a half before Dad passed away. The first one we read in the book is that God is unchanging, therefore we are secure. I had sent the kids out to bring back a piece of an evergreen tree and a leaf from a deciduous tree. We compared them and talked about how God is like the evergreen tree which never fades. We, however, are like the leaves that change and fade with the seasons.

Remembering our little lesson in the week before the funeral, I realized just how timely and appropriate it was. The two pieces of greenery were still sitting in the kitchen so I retrieved them and
sat down with the kids. We compared the two again: the needles from the evergreen looked about the same, but the leaf was curling up and dying. We talked about Papa. And about Jesus. How we change, fade, grow old, and die, but He is unchanging and eternal, and we can put our hope in Him for eternal
life.

Later Cliff talked with them about putting off this old “tabernacle” to be clothed with new life (2 Corinthians 5:1-4, 2 Peter 1:13-14). What we would see in the casket would not be Papa. Papa was with Jesus. He had left the body of death behind. It was a “tent” he didn’t live in or need anymore.

Brianna understood. She excitedly exclaimed, “Just like a bug sheds its ‘skin’!”

From the adjoining room where I overheard her I had to smile to myself at her analogy.

Yet, crude though it may be, it’s not a bad one.

For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality. So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?…But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory
through our Lord Jesus Christ.

1 Corinthians 15:53-55, 57

No, death is not beautiful.

But the Life Who conquered it is! And Papa is rejoicing in Christ our Life now…

(Healthy!) Icy Treats for Summer Days

20180630_124257Some days in Kansas it feels like there’s more truth to this meme than science will admit, whatever astronomers may say. 😉 Sticky days when it’s near (or over) 100 degrees and you walk outside and the air is sweating on you—this is summer in Kansas…and sometimes spring… It seems if we’re not having sub-freezing temperatures we’re cooking on the pavement.  They say if you don’t like the weather in Kansas, just wait five minutes.

 But if “five minutes” hasn’t fixed it, here are a couple of tasty treats to beat that summer heat. 🙂

Pineapple Lemonade Popsicles

My family loves these! They don’t last long around here. Adjust them to be as sweet or as sour as you like.

  IMG_3922

Cut up a fresh pineapple and measure out approximately 12 oz. freshly chopped. Put this in a blender and add ½ c. fresh-squeezed lemon juice, ½ c. water, ¼ c. raw honey, and a half-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and finely grated (if you don’t have fresh ginger you can use a pinch of powdered ginger). Blend this on high until smooth. IMG_3934

Do the taste test. Do you want it to be sweeter (perhaps the pineapple wasn’t as ripe as it could have been and the lemon is overpowering it)? Add a bit more honey. Or do you love to pucker? Add a bit more lemon juice. (I remember once making these when we had friends staying with us. I must have skipped the taste test because we were definitely puckering, lol.)

And before you pour this frothy mixture into popsicle molds, you can (optionally) add 2 drops of ginger oil, and 4 drops of lemon oil (if you happen to be an essential oil junkie).

Freeze in molds until firm. (And don’t let Daddy find them too soon.) 😉 IMG_3938

Kombucha Kooler

During hot summer days as a kid I would go to the Hawaiian shaved ice stands and order a cup of ice, generously doused with a colorful, sugary flavoring. Or I would go to the gas station and pump a big Coca-Cola icee.

Ice cold sugar heaven. Happy sigh.

But, trying to skip on all the sugar, corn syrup, and food coloring, I haven’t had a “snow cone” (as we called them) or a soda pop icee in years.  

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Over the last couple of years, Cliff and I have taken to really enjoying kombucha, a healthy fermented drink. And it occurred to him one day that we could create a healthy version of our favorite frosty treats from childhood.

So we froze Gingerberrry kombucha in ice cube trays (the brand I buy is GT’s and can be found at Wal-Mart–in the refrigerated fruits and veggies section–and health food stores). Then we blended the cubes to make “shaved ice” (I did mine in a Vitamix). 

Finally, after apportioning this into fancy glasses, I poured some more kombucha over the ice.

Oh. My. Goodness. It took me right back to those glorious snow cone days. Sweet, cold, and refreshing. Incredibly satisfying. 20180503_203808

There are many things you could do with this. You could do part juice and part kombucha and freeze it in trays before blending it. There are also many different flavors and brands of kombucha, and I have even found some that are made to taste like root beer! Sometimes I just freeze the kombucha in trays and my kids help themselves to the cubes. (You can save quite a bit by buying the kombucha in large rather than personal drink sizes, available at health food stores. Or even make your own, like my sister does.) 20180503_204050

So just what is kombucha and why is it good for you?

It’s made by fermenting black and/or green tea and sugar with bacteria and yeast (called a “SCOBY,” which stands for “symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast”). The fermentation process produces lots of healthy bacteria…also known as probiotics. I discussed fermented foods and the importance of healthy bacteria to our gut in a previous post, so I won’t go into too much detail here. But essentially it’s very good for gut (and brain) health. The kombucha becomes naturally carbonated, giving it that wonderful fizzy, bubbly characteristic, reminiscent of soda pop. It’s high in B vitamins, enzymes, antioxidants, and probiotics, and the good bacteria found in it actually helps combat bad bacteria (lab studies found it to have antibacterial effects).

Dr. Josh Axe writes,

Research from the University of Latvia in 2014 claims that drinking kombucha tea can be beneficial for many infections and diseases “due to four main properties: detoxification, anti-oxidation, energizing potencies and promotion of depressed immunity.”

The main thing when choosing kombucha is to make sure it is raw (not pasteurized), and the sugar content is not too high. My family has been enjoying this drink for a long time. While it may not be everyone’s cup of tea (pun intended), if you haven’t yet, give it a try! 🙂

Swim Lessons and Children’s Devotionals

Mom, look at me! I can do it!”

I sweltered in the near mid-day sun next to the pool where my kids were both excitedly calling for my attention, but repeatedly smiled, nodded, and gave them the “thumbs up.”

They were taking their first-ever swimming class.

Water has been a little initimidating for us, so some milestones were observed that first day as Bri ventured off from the reassuring steps and rails and began to actually play in and enjoy the water (even jumping off the diving board!); and Marcus, of his own free will, let himself touch bottom.

The next day it had rained and it was cool, so the instructors did not have anyone get in the pool. Instead, they had the kids watch water safety videos. It was not “swimming,” but it provided some important information.

* * * * *

A few weeks ago while searching Grace and Truth Books  for a gift for someone, I came across Lydia White’s The Attributes of God for Kids. Seeing that it was loosely based on A. W. Tozer’s Knowledge of the Holy, I was intrigued. (Yes, an extra book made it into my order. Cue cheesy grin emoji.) IMG_3913

This bright, cheerfully colorful devotional appears exceptionally kid-friendly. Simple and to the point with relatable illustrations (and a touch of reverent humor), this looks like a great doctrinal introduction of the character of God for children.

The book is divided into two parts: the first covers ten of God’s UNIQUE attributes (unchanging, infinite, creator, eternal, self-sufficient, omniscient, omnipotent, omnipresent, sovereign, and trinity); the second covers eleven of His MORAL attributes (He is good, just, righteous, merciful, gracious, loving, holy, jealous, wise, truthful, and faithful). IMG_3914

Each attribute of God is paired with a very simple symbolic picture; these serve as memory pegs as the kids wind their way through the Attributes chart (free download included; also, stickers can be printed off on Amazon that correspond with a blank spaces chart so kids can fill them in as they go; plus there are free downloadable flashcards and other extras).  IMG_3921

Each attribute is also paired with a corresponding truth about me. Because God is Unchanging, I am Secure. Because God is Gracious, I am Accepted. And so on. This brings these truths down to a personal level—what they mean for me, today. As we learn Who God is, our faith and trust in Him can grow.

Each lesson has its own two-page spread and is broken down into several short sections: a brief explanation, an application (what this truth means for me), suggested Scripture readings, verse to memorize (and even a suggested reading in The Jesus Storybook Bible), a prayer, and Scripture praise songs (from Seeds Family Worship). IMG_3920 

Because I want to extend each attribute to a week-long study, I’m making some notes as I come up with additional activities. And because it’s been by my bed while I’ve been in the process of doing this, I’ve actually been using it in my own worship time in the morning. (Yes, a children’s book!) But its truths are enduring and worship-inducing.

* * * * *

So what do swim lessons and kids’ devotionals have to do with each other?

I’ve just been thinking about the teaching of doctrinal truths to children and the place of books—such as The Attributes of God—in their lives. We read the Bible to our children. We help them memorize Scripture. We read books to them. We inculcate them with doctrinal truths—facts. Yes, plain old facts. These facts in and of themselves are not life-changing. Reading a book about the character of God will not automatically make a child understand Who He really is. Knowing God goes far beyond the academic, piercing more than the frontal lobe of our brain. It is grasped both in life relationship with Christ, and through the Spirit’s illumination of the Word to the believer.

But I believe that ingraining our children’s minds with these truths—these basic facts—about God can be used by Him to draw them to Himself through the work of His Spirit, as they learn that He is good, trustworthy, and sovereign. They have their place. They are not, of themselves, transformative; but in the hand of the Spirit they are tools. They are not Life; but they can point to Life. We pray for our children that truth will awaken their conscience and touch their heart.

Our hope is not in cramming our children’s heads with knowledge; our hope is in the Lord who can take the truth we give these precious little minds and use it to draw them to Himself.

My kids are in Level 1 swimming lessons this week (and next). They don’t actually learn to swim yet, of course. They blow bubbles. They float. They kick. They dunk their heads and bob for rings. Even outside the pool they receive rudimentary instruction on water safety. Is all this a waste of time because it’s not actual, “experiential” swimming?

Of course not. They are being carefully prepared to experience real swimming for themselves. In the final analysis it’s up to them to get in the water and swim. All the books and videos and instruction in the world can’t be a substitute for that. But all this technical instruction is leading up to that by preparing their minds and bodies for it.

In the same way, our children can only truly know God by seeking Him for themselves as He draws them to Himself. They can only experience Him by taking that plunge and casting themselves on Christ. As parents our role is to make the most of the time we have with our children, patiently instructing, line upon rudimentary line. Doctrinal truth upon doctrinal truth. Fact upon fact.

And then, to let them see us “swimming”: “doing life” in Christ. Acknowledging our own daily need of Him. Sincerely seeking to grow in grace, knowledge, and truth.

First steps. First kicks. Even a little bubble-blowing. It’s the way of life. 🙂

 And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: and thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up…And thou shalt write them upon the posts of thy house, and on thy gates…And when thy son asketh thee in time to come, What mean the testimonies, and the statutes, and the judgments, which the Lord our God hath commanded you? Then thou shalt say unto thy son, We were Pharaoh’s bondmen in Egypt; and the Lord brought us out of Egypt with a mighty hand…And the Lord commanded us to do all these statutes, to fear the Lord our God, for our good always…

See Deuteronomy 6

But let him that glorieth glory in this, that he understandeth and knoweth me, that I am the Lord which exercise lovingkindness, judgment, and righteousness, in the earth: for in these things I delight, saith the Lord.

 

Jeremiah 9:24

The Day of the Sauerkraut

20180501_102700Today was the day!

With great anticipation I unscrewed the lid from my mason jar and lifted it away. A pinkish-red color greeted my eyes. One more layer to remove. I picked off the large piece of red cabbage lying atop my “green gold” at the mouth of the jar. Into the trash can it went.

And now for the smell test.

I held the jar below my nose and took a deep whiff.

Fermented cabbage. Honest-to-goodness, homemade sauerkraut.

Oh. Yes. Mmmm.

The green cabbage towards the top of the jar was tinged a faint pink where it had come in contact with my red cabbage “weight.”

Funky color or no, it smelled amazing. I wanted to dig in, but remembered what my mother had said about the prospective product a few weeks ago when she had first instructed me in the fine arts of fermentation: “It’s best to eat it raw,” said she, “but since you’re pregnant,” said she, “you’d better heat it first,” said she.

Mothers know best.

I dutifully warmed a small serving of this gut-nourishing goodness in a saucepan on the stove—just to kill any potential naughty “wee beasties,” as Anton van Leeuwenhoek so quaintly dubbed them (though it probably unfortunately killed some of the nice “wee beasties” too).

My Brassica olaracea var. capitata which had soaked in a sea salt-water bath like a Persian queen for two weeks delivered.

It was divine.

Metabolically, a hunky heap of carbohydrates had been converted by the efforts of bacterial organisms into organic acids. Metaphorically, heaven had met earth. Oh la la. (A bit dramatic, you say? Oh maybe slightly. 😉 )

My five-year-old took a whiff. “Mmmm,” he said with a smile. Then a strange look came over him and he scrunched his face as he walked away.

Apparently first impressions didn’t last for him.

No matter. If you’re a sauerkraut lover, a health junkie, or simply an adventurous soul, check out the recipe and instructions below for making your own invigorating victuals.

Enjoy. 🙂

* * * * *

1 Head of cabbage

Water

Celtic sea salt or Himalayan salt

To clean cabbage, soak it for 5-10 minutes in a bowl of filtered water with 1 Tbs. apple cider vinegar added. Rinse.

Slice (or shred) cabbage and put in a clean bowl. Add 1 Tbs. salt; let sit for 10 minutes, then knead and squeeze the cabbage for 10 minutes (this helps break it down and release its juices). When finished, add another ½ Tbs. salt (1 Tbs. if it’s a particularly large head).

Fill glass jars with cabbage (I filled them just up to the bottom of the neck; one large cabbage filled 2 quart jars and 1 pint jar). Add any juice (left over from the cabbage) from the bowl to the jars. Now fill the jars with a salt water brine (be sure all of the cabbage is covered in liquid).

Brine:

1 ½ tsp. Celtic sea salt for every 8 ounces of water

The last thing to add is something to make sure the cabbage stays pushed down into the liquid so it doesn’t mold. Special stainless steel “weights” are made just for this purpose but I didn’t have any on hand. Two other options would be to either use a large, round onion slice, or another cabbage leaf that can fill the neck of the jar and keep the shredded cabbage pushed down into the brine.

Screw the lids on and label the date. Store in a dry, preferably dark place for 2-3 weeks. Check every 2-3 days for white mold (I never had a problem with this).

When ready to eat, place in refrigerator (it can last 6 months here).

* * * * *

So why sauerkraut for health?

The wonder-working properties of this food lies in its live probiotics, which have amazing benefits for our guts. When we eat sauerkraut, healthy little “gut bugs” take up residence in our digestive tracts; some even form long-lasting colonies! The probiotics feed these “good guys” and help fight the “bad guys” (bad bacteria).

This leads to improved digestion and immune function, a reduction in inflammation and allergies, and a host of other health benefits. Food allergies, autoimmune disorders, and many other health problems are being linked to an unhealthy gut microbiome.

The modern American diet wrecks havoc on the gut. One young man ate nothing but fast food for 10 days to see what would happen to his gut. Before he started, he had about 3,500 healthy bacterial species in his gut. By the end of this experiment, 1,300 of those species had been wiped out, and his gut was dominated by an unhealthy species of bacteria.

Antibiotics are another gut enemy, of course. One microbiologist who studied the link between antibiotics and asthma was astounded by his findings: mice treated with certain antibiotics experienced “a profound asthmatic reaction.” He concluded that this was due to a change in the gut microbiome following adminstration of antibiotics.

The composition of our gut microbes have been drastically altered through unhealthy foods/imbalanced diets, antibiotics, pesticides (like glyphosate, which damages the gut lining and contributes to an overgrowth of harmful bacteria), reduced exposure to parasites and diseases, etc. Yet the state of our health will reflect the state of our gut microbiome.

So one of the best things we can do (not just for our gut, but for the health of our whole body), is regularly eat fermented foods which help to “re-colonize” our digestive tract with our body’s first line of defense against a myriad of health issues: “good guy” bacteria. Many pills and supplements touted as containing “lots of probiotics” are practically worthless. You may basically only be paying for expensive poop (because that’s where most of these “probiotics” are going in the end—no pun). Consuming live, fermented foods is one of the best ways to help you get what your gut needs, in nature’s own complex balance. So eat up!

And happy gut health to you! 😉 20180501_133359