Christian Non-fiction Read in 2019

Part 3 of my series of posts with micro-reviews of books read in 2019. Part 1 here, Part 2 here.

Run Today’s Race by Oswald Chambers. This small book, consisting of pithy sayings or “seed thoughts” (as Chambers liked to call them), was compiled by his family after his death. There is one such thought for each day of the calendar year; you could think of this as My Utmost for His HighestLite.”

August 20

There is nothing so secure as the salvation of God; it is as eternal as the mountains, and it is our trust in God that brings us the conscious realisation of this.

Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God by Jonathan Edwards. Edwards’ fiery sermon, delivered in a calm, monotone voice and resulting in many conversions and a great revival in a church that had previously been dead to God and His Word, is the most famous sermon ever preached on American soil. He didn’t mince words as he warned men to flee from the wrath to come—and fly to the arms of Christ, open in mercy. I had assigned this booklet to Brianna for reading, so I read it too. 😉

Your wickedness makes you as heavy as lead; it drives you down, with great weight and pressure, toward hell. And if God were to let you go, you would immediately sink and swiftly descend and plunge into the bottomless gulf. At that moment, you will see that your health, your own care and prudence, your best contrivance, and all your righteousness, have no more influence to uphold you and keep you out of hell, than a spider’s web has to stop a falling rock.

Alone in Majesty: The Attributes of a Holy God by William MacDonald. Short, worshipful and thought-provoking chapters explore different attributes of God’s character—both unique, and shared. Includes study guide. I used this during my morning prayer times.

How grateful we should be that God has given us minds that are able to consider His knowledge, holiness, love, power, and wisdom. True, we see through a glass darkly. But never mind! It is still a tremendous privilege to stretch our minds to the limit in contemplating His divine attributes.

What is the Gospel? by Greg Gilbert. In eight concise little chapters, Gilbert defines and explains the gospel. It’s a good read for the Christian, and also an excellent evangelistic tool. In a nutshell, he sums up the gospel in this way:

We are accountable to the God who created us. We have sinned against that God and will be judged. But God has acted in Jesus Christ to save us, and we take hold of that salvation by repentance from sin and faith in Jesus.

God. Man. Christ. Response.

Christ Loved the Church by William MacDonald. My husband really liked this book and asked me to read it. Barely over a 100 pages, it deals with the teachings of the epistles on the body of Christ—who it is comprised of, its functions, leadership, unity, purpose, ordinances, etc. MacDonald encourages us to pursue love and unity as we seek to restore the simplicity of the church gathering.

“Christ also loved the church and gave Himself for her,” (Eph. 5:25). We, too, should love the church…We should sacrificially and devotedly give ourselves in loving, glad service in order that the church on earth might progress, prosper and triumph.

Classics and Novels Read in 2019

Continuing the series of posts on my 2019 book list, these are the novels I read. 🙂

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. I remember watching the movie (with Gregory Peck) as a child, but I had never read the book. The movie was good but the book—even better. The story is set in the south during the Great Depression and brings to light the racial tensions of that era.

Scout is a young girl whose father is a lawyer. When a young black man is accused of raping a white girl, her father agrees to take the unpopular case. Tension in the town escalates and Scout finds herself in the middle of all the drama, coming to terms with growing up and learning what it means to stand on principles without compromise.

Lee’s novel is a lesson on how to write a novel. I sat down and analyzed her writing style, picking it apart into little pieces and taking notes in order to better my own writing.

The Sea Wolf by Jack London. Wolves seem to figure prominently in London’s action-filled novels. In The Sea Wolf, the savage beast of prey takes a human form. Wolf Larsen is the cruel, feared, and hated captain of the Ghost, a sealing schooner. When by a freak turn of events a bookish intellectual named Humphrey Van Weyden winds up aboard the schooner, two men, two worlds, and two life philosophies collide sharply in exaggerated contrast to one another. Both fists and philosophical quips fly between them as each seeks to discover what the other is made of.

The theme of this book is philosophically existential in nature: What is the purpose or meaning of life? Is there life after death? What of God? Darwinism and natural selection?

Jack London was a self-proclaimed atheist. But what is most interesting is that he endued both his protagonist and his antagonist with pieces of his own life philosophy—then pitted them against each other in crude juxtaposition. Van Weyden (or “Hump” as he comes to be referred to) is an idealist, an altruist; one who believes in immortality, in God, in the goodness of life.

Wolf Larsen is the atheist, the materialist, prominently exalting a selfish individualism and hedonism as his virtues and seeing life in every form as a Darwinian, crawling “yeast,” agreeing with “the Preacher” (whom he loves to quote) that “all is vanity and vexation of spirit.” He compares himself to Lucifer and proudly defies his Maker.

London himself embodied the idealism and altruism of “Hump,” and the atheism of the Wolf. The book almost seems to read like an inner argument of the author with himself. Perhaps the most telling scene is when Wolf Larsen, while imbibing a breathtaking scene of nature, reveals his own inner struggle when he says with deep, wistful longing:

“I am filled with a strange uplift; I feel as if all time were echoing through me, as though all powers were mine. I know truth, divine good from evil, right from wrong. My vision is clear and far. I could almost believe in God.”

In his antagonist, London essentially admitted that if there was no God and no immortality, London’s own morality, altruism and idealism were schizophrenic—utterly pointless. He had no answers for this irreconcilable paradox. In the story Wolf Larsen gives expression to his secret desire to be able to see life as his opponent does, but feels there is no hope for him to do so. Did this mirror a conflict in London’s own soul? It seems to read to me as a searching, rather than a declaration; a question rather than a statement.

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen. Wow. This was not your typical hearts-and-flowers romance novel (though what am I talking about? I’ve never read romance novels, lol). This book had some meat to it: the contrast of sense/wisdom and folly, the elevation of virtue, the condemnation of bad character and unsound judgment.

Elinor, the eldest of the three young Dashwood sisters, is a girl with a good heart and good sense. Marianne, the second, though a sweet, wonderful person, is forcefully driven by her changing feelings and emotions—and loves to have it so. She fully gives herself up to whatever emotion she is feeling without checking it or demonstrating self-restraint if appropriate.

The girls fall in love with two very different men. When all their dreams come crashing down, they have two very different responses to their heartbreak.

A thoroughly satisfying novel with lots of food for thought.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. I loved this novel. The sarcasm, humor, wit, the playful banter, the unforgettable characters. I can see why this has endured as a popular classic.

Miss Elizabeth Bennett and her sisters are in want of husbands in 19th century England—or rather, ahem, “it is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.” When two high-society—and so wonderfully single!—young men move in “next door,” the whole neighborhood is in a flutter.

But when Eliza meets the daunting Mr. Darcy for the first time, she is hardly charmed. His rude, arrogant, and offputting behavior make her quickly decide he is the last man on earth she would ever be prevailed upon to marry.

And so begins this surprising, humorous romance with its many twists and turns.

“There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil, a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome.”

“And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody.”

“And yours,” he replied with a smile, “is wilfully to misunderstand them.”

Emma by Jane Austen. Jane Austen said of the book’s title character, “I am going to take a heroine who no one but myself will much like.”

She was wrong. For all her foibles and follies, many readers have come to love Emma since the book was first published in 1815.

Emma grows up in a well-to-do family as an intelligent, talented, independent, and attractive young lady with bright prospects. But she has a tendency to trust too much to her own judgment and to meddle in the affairs of others. This well-intentioned meddling soon sets Highbury in a spin as things completely unexpected and beyond her control begin to happen. What will come of it all? Can the confusing web be untangled?

Austen knew how to create living characters—and develop them well. Her characters display good or evil character, and because they are so human, even the heros and heroines are allotted their faults. But the difference between the wise and the foolish in her stories is pronounced: the wise learn from their mistakes, are teachable, and repent; the foolish don’t even recognize their own folly, much less take a course of action to turn from it.

I think her books have endured and are so loved because her characters (while sometimes caricaturized) are highly relatable, because she deftly deals satire and wit, and because the deeper theme of a man or woman’s character—how their actions and attitudes affect themselves and those around them—runs through every page of her novels.

By the Light of a Thousand Stars by Jamie Langston Turner. A friend had recommended this author to me, so I went to the library and chose one of her books at random. 🙂 This story is told in sections from the perspective of four different female characters, each one facing the rough stuff life brings with varying responses.

A theme running through it is the wonder of how God uses our everyday interactions with others to bring people to Himself—and why we should trust Him and believe He will work for good in those around us as we strive to faithfully share Jesus. Those who turn many to righteousness will “shine as the stars forever.”

The Book of the Dun Cow by Walter Wangerin Jr.

This is an allegory of the battle between good and evil. Chauntecleer the rooster and the other barnyard animals go about their daily lives with no idea that they are keepers of Wyrm, the great evil locked in the center of the earth. It is their job to keep him there.

When a rooster from another farm listens to the wily temptations of Wyrm, Cockatrice is hatched–and all hell breaks loose. Rich in symbolism, this was a great read. (Some language.)

The earth had a face, then: smiling blue and green and gold and gentle, or frowning in furious gouts of black thunder. But it was a face, and that’s where the animals lived, on the surface of it. But under that surface, in its guts, the earth was a prison. Only one creature lived inside of the earth, then, because God had damned him there. He was the evil the animals kept. His name was Wyrm.

Paradise Lost and Other Poems by John Milton. This epic poem by the 17th century Christian writer was the first English poem to be sold by subscription and to be made the subject of a detailed critical study. Milton addresses the problem of evil in the world: the fall of Satan, the sin of Adam and Eve, and the justice and mercy of God the Creator. (My edition also included various early poems, sonnets, etc.)

I enjoyed it, highlighting many of my favorite parts. I realized that in order to get the most out of his works one needs to be well-versed in Greek mythology (which I am not). His many allusions and metaphors draw heavily on this and ancient history. The breadth and scope of the man’s education is itself incredible.

I would have a difficult time choosing my very favorite from the books above, but Sense and Sensibility would definitely be among those I most enjoyed. Favorite novels read in 2019–what are yours?

Family Read-Alouds for 2019

The last several years my end-of-year book posts with micro-reviews of everything we’ve read for the year have grown longer and longer. I made it through 33 books in 2019, so this year I’m going to split them up by categories, starting with the books the kids and I read aloud together (or in a few cases, that I previewed for them to read on their own). 🙂

The Best Christmas Pageant Ever by Barbara Robinson. This was a favorite of mine as a child and I finally shared it with my kids this year. When the Herdmans—the “worst kids in the history of the world”—show up asking to participate in a church pageant, the story of the birth of Christ is about to become very touching and real for them and for those who come to see the play.

This story will have you laughing…and possibly crying. We started and finished this 80-page book in one sitting then watched the movie based on it.

The Bronze Bow by Elizabeth George Speare. Speare’s Newberry award-winning children’s novel was published in 1961. It tells the tale of a young Jewish man named Daniel who seeks revenge on the hated Romans who have conquered his land. He and a band of other Jewish boys eagerly await the return of the promised Messiah, hoping He will rid them of their enemies.

When a Teacher from Galilee shows up and multitudes begin to follow Him Daniel is intrigued, but hesitant. Will this man wreck vengeance on their enemies? Or has He come for some other purpose? Is He the answer to their longings? Or just another distraction?

The Hedge of Thorns, Lamplighter Rare Collection Series. Years ago my husband read this short little book. He was very impressed and decided that one day he would have his children read it.

That day came—this year. I ordered a copy from Grace and Truth Books and shared this little gem with the kids. Originally written in 1611, its language has been updated to better convey its timeless truths to young people of modern day. It tells the story of a brother and his little sister who learn that God sometimes puts “thorns” in our path to protect us from greater spiritual dangers.

A brief ten chapters, it’s a great little read—I recommend!

Poems of Robert Louis Stevenson, selected by Helen Plotz. I picked this up at a used book store one day and decided to use it as a read-aloud with the kids. The beginning of the book contains a short biography of Stevenson’s life. This Scottish author of classic favorites such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped was quite a character himself!

The collection was quite varied; some of the featured poems were written for children, while some dealt with more mature themes like death and loss (there were even several I chose to skip when reading them to the kids, due to his sometimes irreverent way of expressing his opinions on religion).

Paddington’s Storybook. I have always loved A. A. Milne’s classic characters from the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. But after reading Paddington I realized I was finding a place in my heart for the loveable, innocent, silly bear who turns every situation into a disaster—and yet manages to save it all in the end.

With the story set in London, my kids (and even husband) were going around making little exclamations like “Crikey!” after reading this book (English authors/books are so fun!).

On the Banks of Plum Creek by Laura Ingalls Wilder. Another sequel in the Little House series, Laura tells the story of her family’s settlement in Minnesota, the good times and the challenges they faced as they started life again after they had to leave Kansas.

Wild Light by Erik Stensland. This is not a children’s book.  It’s not even fiction. I had bought this in anticipation of visiting Rocky Mountain National Park during a family trip. We wanted to learn what we could about it. Stunning photography combined with scant but informative text about the history, wildlife, and original peoples of the Rocky Mountains make this a great coffee table book.

Sarah, Plain and Tall and Caleb’s Story by Patricia MacLachlan. I remember watching the movie series based on these children’s books years ago, but I’d never actually read the books.

In Sarah, Plain and Tall, a woman from Maine answers a mail-order bride advertisement to meet a widower and his two young children in Kansas. Caleb’s Story continues the tale, in which a stranger with a dark secret shows up on their farm when Caleb is a teenager (there’s actually another book between these two, but the library didn’t have it so I haven’t read it yet).

These are sweet stories about family, love, fortitude, and forgiveness. They’re easy reads for young ones, too—Sarah, Plain and Tall was just 58 pages, and Caleb’s Story 116.

White Fur Flying by Patricia MacLachlan. In search of more books for Brianna, I turned to Ambleside Online for suggestions. The Sarah, Plain and Tall series were on that list. When I found them at the library I also swiped several other titles by the same author off the shelf to preview.

In White Fur Flying, a dog-loving family becomes curious about their mysterious new neighbors. The little boy doesn’t speak, and the woman and her husband keep to themselves. It takes the special love of a dog to bring all of them out of their shell so hurts can heal.

Fly Away by Patricia MacLachlan. This may have been my favorite of the MacLachlan titles. A family goes to help their aunt with her farm during a flooding. The eldest child loves writing poetry and wishes she could sing. She has a secret she keeps to herself: her baby brother, Teddy, can sing beautifully. He sings to her every night, and they have a special bond. When Teddy suddenly disappears during the flood, family comes together and secrets are revealed.

Kindred Souls by Patricia MacLachlan. Family love figures prominently as a theme in MacLachlan’s stories and this book is no exception. A boy and his grandfather share a tight bond together. To surprise Billy, the grandfather, the family comes together and builds him a sod house, just like he used to have. As Billy’s health deteriorates, a dog comes into his life and stays with him, keeping him happy.

There was one thing in this book I had to discuss with Bri. In the story, the dog shows up and then after the grandfather’s death it disappears. It is implied/suggested at the end that the dog was an angel. I explained to Bri that the Bible does not say that angels take the form of animals. Might not be the biggest deal, but was something we talked about.

52 Spurgeon Stories for Children Book 1: How a Spider Saved a Man’s Life by Tony Hutter. We finished the first book in this 5-volume series and we’re hooked! These are great, simple devotional readings (two short pages each) that are very interesting and entertaining. He uses each illustration to teach a biblical truth.

We really enjoyed the story about the monster—when Spurgeon is walking home from preaching one night he sees a ghostly apparition.

What does he do?

He attacks it!

Usually Spurgeon wasn’t scared of anything, but this particular evening he really was frightened. He suddenly saw something awful, horrible, terrible! It was like a giant, a monster, with great outstretched arms! Whatever was it?

To find out, you’ll have to read the story for yourself… 😉

What books has your family enjoyed reading aloud together?

 

2017 Book List

Happy New Year!  It’s 2018!

Here’s my annual recap of books our family read the last twelve months. You may notice that my reading list for this last year includes mostly children’s books. In tallying it up I realized that, besides the Bible and miscellaneous books I’ve started but haven’t finished yet, I’ve only actually completed five books for myself this year.

Oh well. The kids and I covered quite a bit of ground in the children’s department—I’m sure they’re satisfied with my lopsided reading list. 😉

The Excellent Wife by Martha Peace. Both doctrinal and practical teachings on the role of the wife. Peace encourages women to focus on the Lord and His gospel in their marriages, doing all that they do as unto Him, rather than for selfish gain.

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Whether her husband is a faithful Christian man or an unbeliever, God wants every Christian woman to be a godly wife—an excellent wife.

The Religious Beliefs of America’s Founders by Gregg L. Frazer. Dr. Frazer is professor of history and political studies at The Master’s College (I was briefly in correspondence with him concerning my own manuscript). I first read an article he had written in an issue of Answers in Genesis several years ago. I was rather shocked then—and pleasantly surprised—to find a major Christian publication conveying a view as unpopular—but historically sound—as Frazer’s.

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His book is excellent. He delves into the multidimensional nuances of the Founding Fathers’ key political and religious beliefs in a way I’ve not seen done by anyone else. Taking neither the position of the secularists—who claim the Founders were deists, and deny any serious religious influence—nor the position of the “Christian America” advocates, who have romanticized the Founding era and misrepresented the Founders’ true beliefs—Frazer brings sanity to the debate, illuminating the theistic rationalism of the key Founders of this country. He then explains how this theistic rationalism (which had its focus on moralism and avoided theology) became the basis for the American civil religion—a “God and Country” sort of “Christianity,” focused on patriotism and moralism. Every American should read this.

Both the secular and Christian America schools of thought, then, are warmly received by their intended audiences. Consequently, there is little motivation to investigate the evidence and to make an independent analysis. This book presents the results of such an independent analysis and finds both views wanting.

Anthem by Ayn Rand. This was a short and interesting read. A story written in poetic form, it decries collectivism and exalts individualism. From a political standpoint, I share Rand’s perspective on many things. However, we take two vastly different philosophical paths to arrive at similar political conclusions. Rand sees man as God, which is her ultimate argument for individualism. She sees life as being an ode, an anthem, to the ego of man; everything revolves around man the creature. Rand was a very libertarian-minded thinker, but she rejected God and therefore had no objective basis for morality. Her life philosophy was tainted accordingly—and this creaturely pride profusely bleeds through Anthem.

And as we all undress at night, in the dim light of the candles, our brothers are silent, for they dare not speak the thoughts of their minds. For all must agree with all, and they cannot know if their thoughts are the thoughts of all, and so they fear to speak.

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. A classic tale of censorship. The job of Guy Montag and his fellow firemen is to start fires—not put them out. Shooting kerosene through their hoses instead of water, they burn down houses that contain books (all but comic books, sex magazines, and trade journals are banned). Minorities might be offended by certain books, and man must be kept happy, distracted from what his government is doing. Intellectualism is a dirty word. The populace must keep themselves busy with pleasures and distractions, with sports and entertainment, but must never think, for thinking is dangerous—and might offend someone. (Note: there’s a fair bit of language.) 

…We must all be alike. Not everyone born free and equal, as the Constitution says, but everyone made equal. Each man the image of every other; then all are happy, for there are no mountains to make them cower, to judge themselves against. So! A book is a loaded gun in the house next door. Burn it. Take the shot from the weapon. Breach man’s mind. Who knows who might be the target of the well-read man?…”

The Fallacy Detective by Nathanaiel and Hans Bluedorn. Fun book from the homeschooled Bluedorn brothers! Using simple language and many humorous illustrations, Nathaniel and Hans explain the basic forms of bad reasoning and logical fallacies. This is a book I intended to get my kids when they were older (recommended for ages 13 through adult), but when I found a used copy one day for $4, I nabbed it and read it myself. This will be fun to go through as a family—each short lesson has lots of discussion questions (there are 36 lessons in all). I’m thinking this might be a great book for family dinner-time table-talk someday. 😉

Order a copy for your family before these books disappear off the shelves! No parent pursuing the highest standards of academic attainment for their child would be without this book! The study of logic is an ancient and honored tradition!

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Oh wait…did I just make use of propaganda techniques like “exigency,” “snob appeal,” and “appeal to tradition”…?

Torturer: “You are a heretic. You can’t prove that you aren’t one, so you are a heretic. Confess, or we will stretch your body out until you are a foot taller.”

Accused: “Ha, you did it—you committed a fallacy! I learned all about it in a book called The Fallacy Detective.”

Torturer: “That’s enough cheek out of you. Brutus, give the wheel another turn.”

So that’s about the extent of my personal reading this year. Here follows the list of children’s books the kids and I went through together:

Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’ Dell. A classic children’s tale of a female “Robinson Crusoe,” marooned on an island for many years after her people left. This is actually based on a true story. The kids found it fascinating.

Until that summer, I had kept count of all the moons since the time my brother and I were alone on the island. For each one that came and went I cut a mark in a pole beside the door of my house. There were many marks, from the roof to the floor. But after that summer I did not cut them anymore. The passing of the moons now had come to mean little, and I only made marks to count the four seasons of the year. The last year I did not count those.

Missionary Stories with the Millers by Mildred A. Martin. A collection of true, exciting stories about Christian missionaries. I read this book to the kids; Bri could hardly stand for me to put it down, lol. I read it first as a young teenager, and I remember it making a profound impression on me; it really strengthened my own faith. It’s written by a Mennonite, but only a few of the stories are about Mennonite missionaries.

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The featured missionaries include such well-known men and women as David Livingston, Hudson Taylor, and Amy Carmichael, as well as less-known figures such as Alvin Frey, Jack McGuckin, and August Eicher. Twenty-nine stories in total.

Lying motionless, he waited for another bullet, but none came. “If I keep still, they may think I am dead already,” Gary thought with sudden hope. Eyes closed, he listened alertly. Yes, the voices of the attacking guerrillas were fading in the distance as they trooped off up the trail!

Now We Are Six by A. A. Milne. A charming collection of sundry poems written by the author who created the Winnie the Pooh stories and all their memorable characters. Both of my kids enjoyed this book.

When I was one,

I had just begun.

When I was two,

I was nearly new.

When I was three,

I was hardly me…

The Complete Tales of Beatrix Potter by Beatrix Potter. In this book, we made our way through all the tales we had not previously read together by individual chapter books. From Peter Rabbit and farmer MacGregor to little Pig Robinson, Potter’s entire collection of stories was here, including those she never published/released to the public during her lifetime. Obviously an avid lover of nature, her quaint little animal characters and their stories often highlight simple moral lessons.

Jemima Puddle-duck was a simpleton: not even the mention of sage and onions made her suspicious.

Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White. Of life, of love, of beauty, this is the classic tale of a friendship between a spider and pig. After we read the book together, the kids watched both the movie and the old classic cartoon.

You have been my friend. That in itself is a tremendous thing. I wove my webs for you because I liked you. After all, what’s a life, anyway? We’re born, we live a little while, we die. A spider’s life can’t help being something of a mess, with all this trapping and eating flies. By helping you, perhaps I was trying to lift up my life a trifle. Heaven knows anyone’s life can stand a little of that.”

Stuart Little by E. B. White. This rambling and humorously outrageous tale about a mouse named Stuart (pardon me, he only looked very much like a mouse in every way), was written by the author of Charlotte’s Web. The ending was so abrupt that when I turned the last page and announced the story was over, Brianna gave me a dumbfounded look and exclaimed, “What!? That can’t be the end! There has to be more! What!?”

He wiped his face with his handkerchief, for he was quite warm from the exertion of being Chairman of the World. It had taken more running and leaping and sliding than he had imagined.

The Ology: Ancient Truths Ever New by Marty Machowski. Machowski breaks “big” theological concepts down into simple, bite-size pieces, making them accessible for even very young children (for whom it is written). Each teaching is related to something familiar to children in order to help them understand it.

Covering everything from the inerrancy of Scripture, to the doctrine of the Trinity, to gospel terms like “justification,” “sanctification,” etc., it’s a fairly comprehensive introductory to theology for little tikes. At one point, after reading about the substitutionary atonement of Christ in the book, Marcus excused himself to go to his room to pray. He came back and told me, “I told Jesus I believe on Him.”

Occasionally (rarely) I came across a concept which I chose to approach from a little bit different angle or explain in a little bit different wording than the book, but overall I think the book helped my kids grasp some really good stuff.

Oak trees sprout from acorns and toads begin as tadpoles, but God never had a beginning… The day ends when the clock strikes twelve. The race ends at the finish line. But God never ends.

The Complete Tales of Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne. They were all here: Milne’s classic, beloved stories of a boy and his bear.

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“Oh! Piglet,” said Pooh excitedly, “we’re going on an Expotition, all of us, with things to eat. To discover something.”

“To discover what?” said Piglet anxiously.

“Oh! just something.”

“Nothing fierce?”

“Christopher Robin didn’t say anything about fierce. He just said it had an ‘x’.”

“It isn’t their necks I mind,” said Piglet earnestly. “It’s their teeth.”

Pharaoh’s Boat by David Weitzman. Written for children, this is the story of the boat that Cheops had buried with him (in pieces) for his journey to the afterlife. It was discovered in 1954 and assembled for the first time many years later.

As they dug, there suddenly appeared an old stone boundary wall. Strange. They weren’t expecting to find a wall here… Had the wall been deliberately built there to hide something?

Julie Andrews’ Treasury for all Seasons (poems selected by Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton). “Maria” of The Sound of Music (Julie Andrews) collected these poems and songs celebrating the seasons, months, and special days for children. From Emily Dickinson to Jack Prelutsky, many authors’ poems are featured here (180+ pages). While there was a couple I skipped over (due to theme or for some other reason), this was a very nice (and fun!) collection, each page sweetly illustrated by Marjorie Priceman.

Then read from the treasured volume

The poem of thy choice,

And lend to the rhyme of the poet

The beauty of thy voice.

Backyard Explorer Leaf and Tree Guide by Rona Beame. This kid-friendly pocket-book is filled with illustrations, photos, and descriptions related to all things trees. It explains basic scientific categorizations and facts in simple terms, contains photos of many leaves for tree identification, and has a section on nature projects. Fun little book—perfect for toting on nature walks!

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Have you ever brought home a leaf and wondered what kind of tree it belonged to? …Then get set to go on an exciting nature hunt!

Fifty Famous Stories Retold by James Baldwin. An oldie but goodie, this collection of stories includes tales from ancient Rome to 18th century America: Julius Caesar, George Washington, William the Conqueror, Robin Hood and King Alfred—the legends of these and many other characters are told in short-story form.

At last the day came, and then the very hour. Damon was ready to die. His trust in his friend was as firm as ever; and he said that he did not grieve at having to suffer for one whom he loved so much.

So that’s it!  What stories/books have you and your family enjoyed this last year?