“Art of Homeschooling” Part 2

This is the second post in a two-part series “Art of Homeschooling.” These notes represent ideas I had for implementing the principles taught in Mystie Winckler’s e-course. You can read the first part here.

Connecting with my Children/Starting the Day Off Right

Our daily schedule looks something like this: We get up, we eat, we do chores, then if I am still busy with chores the kids play or do other activities till it’s time for school. After school they may play. In the afternoons they have quiet time and work on school assignments; after supper in the evening they
play, we read together, etc.

GOALS:

I think I need to stay on top of their time between eating breakfast and starting school; they could be more productive and efficient except that I am distracted and not doing as much directing.

Make sure they are staying busy with chores and not piddling.

If they have free time, channel it properly (suggest exercise outdoors, take a nature walk, or give them an assignment indoors—puzzle, coloring, art, reading, etc.). Help them to see that this time in the morning is already planned and we are just to work through it steadily together.

Teach them to come to me after they complete each assignment. Their day is not their own till after school.

The daily habit I can practice in order to affectionately connect with my children each day is to greet them warmly in the morning with a smile and a hug, and (if I have time the evening before) to write them a “love letter” in their journal.

Laughter throughout the day is another good connection. And when there is time for it, extra fun, games, crafts, and reading. School should not be the only time I spend with them intentionally and meaningfully.

In order to help us be on the same team, working toward the same goals, we can start our day by hugging, holding hands, discussing the plan, and cheerfully encouraging one another to complete it
well. Make eye contact and commend them for something. Notice when they are working together and working well and commend them.

Motivation and Responsibility

I discourage the children’s responsibility by not staying on top of what is happening. If it’s okay for them to just putter out and off and do their own thing while I am busy, I am not requiring responsibility. I’m making it too easy for them to be irresponsible.

The kids are most prone to dawdling in the morning before school, and then sometimes during school (if distracted by something else going on). I don’t detect any specific motivation other than wanting to do whatever is “fun” or “interesting” at the moment.

I am most prone to dawdling in the morning before chores, and in the evening after supper (when I should be doing chores or could be spending time with the kids).

GOALS:

For me, first steps in our home will mean I must have them give an accounting regularly. If I give a directive, I must come back and see that it is followed. I must check their progress and their work. There will have to be a lot of hand-holding at the beginning.

If there is something to do that can be done by one of them, rather than shouldering the brunt of the work myself I should mete out more to to them in age-appropriate segments. I should not clean up after them, or let responsibilities I have assigned to them “slide.”

I tell them being an adult is a lot of work and responsibility. I should also express to them that there is joy/reward attached to that responsibility when carried out well.

I “check out” too often with Facebook or something else I can use as a distraction when I’m feeling unmotivated or overwhelmed. Rather than catch me doing this, they should see me cheerfully plugging along with a song, fulfilling my responsibilities without complaint or irritation. Limit internet
time in morning to a few minutes. NO internet in evening till kids are in their room.

When Cliff asks me to do something I need to be sure I fulfill it right away, setting an example for those under my authority.

Talk about the results of dawdling versus diligence. The natural consequences that result from
dawdling include not getting to have time later to do things we enjoy doing because our tardiness put us
behind and wasted our time that could have later been spent at (guilt-free) leisure. Dawdling goes against what we know is right, and so we sin against our conscience. It steals our leisure time, makes our chores and responsibilities more difficult, and makes us less appreciative of our free time.

Dawdling/laziness does not glorify God. Diligence gives us a good conscience. It permits us to have leisure time when the work is done. And that time can be fully enjoyed, guilt-free.

Persistence and Faithfulness

The feelings most likely to drive me off course are feelings of frustration with how the day is going, and anger and irritability when the kids (or circumstances) aren’t cooperating. Bickering kids, unexpected interruptions, extra work, etc. trigger these feelings.

I am most critical of myself when I am lazy or angry. I am most critical of my children when they are lazy, angry, or rowdy.

GOALS:

How can I respond? Remind myself of what a successful day really looks like: faithfulness. Fruitfulness, rather than perfection.

Attending to the needs of my children in all areas—physical, spiritual, in admonition, discipline, love, training, laughter and good will—is more important than completing a to-do checklist like math, spelling, and laundry. Seeking to worship Christ when a curveball is thrown in my day is worth more than dusted furniture and completed math pages.

I need persistence when the day doesn’t go as planned and I get thrown a lot of extra stuff. Then I’m tempted to give up because I’ve been set back. It was like having the goal in sight and then having someone move the marker while you’re running on the track. I can choose a calm, intentional response by examining my list to see if everything really must be done or if I’m being a perfectionist, then choosing to do the things that are truly a priority with a good attitude—even if it cuts into my “free time.”

I need to learn to have greater flexibility—and that comes by relinquishing control to God rather
than trying to keep a tight fist on it myself.

The feelings most likely to disturb Brianna and Marcus: anger, boredom, frustration. Anger, when they have a conflict together, or when they have been disobedient and require correction. Boredom, when they are confronted with the daily grind of school and chores. Frustration, when they feel overwhelmed by their work or feel like they can’t do a good job with it.

I can help them calm down and learn self-discipline by:

• Learning to stay calm, be cheerful, and be self-disciplined myself

• Teaching them truths about God, themselves, and life (motivate in proper ways; teach Scripture and life truths; give admonition and correction when needed)

• Doing what I can to help them avoid/redirect them from unnecessarily tense and frustrating situations (oversee their work together instead of leaving them alone; designate responsibilities when I am busy and cannot help them; give the right amount of help and encouragement at the right time)

I can trade harshness for humor by bringing the kids to the couch for a talk, ending with tickling/joking so we may leave in good humor.

One specific area the kids and I can practice persistence in together is Bible time. We will start there. We will try to be faithful with devotions every day, not just school days.

*   *   *

What habits have helped you motivate yourself and children, Mamas?

“Art of Homeschooling” Part 1

I stumbled across some notes I had made from Mystie Winckler’s “Art of Homeschooling” course last year while searching for something else the other day. I read them again, and was again reminded of areas of personal growth that I need to persevere in.

Mystie’s course helped me pinpoint and troubleshoot “problem” areas in my life and our school/family life. Her questions were penetrating and her insights illuminating. I would definitely recommend her course! (She conducts the online 5-week course periodically.)

Presented here as abbreviated, edited, reorganized, and otherwise condensed notes, I made these for myself during my brainstorm sessions while working through Mystie’s assignments/reading material. The goals I identified are still that—worthy goals I want to work on, but am far from having consistently attained. 🙂

* * *

Fostering a Love of Learning

I love to learn. I am curious about many things. I spend hours reading, researching, and trying new skills and projects. While teaching school I will sometimes get curious and interested in something and pursue rabbit trails trying to learn more about it. After hours I work on new skills and gaining new knowledge.

My problem is not that I do not model a love of learning. My problem is that I become impatient and ignore the kids when I’m wanting to get my work done precisely so I may pursue my many interests. In such times I selfishly fail to foster their curiosity, questioning, and interest because it’s not convenient for me.

GOALS:

When I notice that they are taking a delight and interest in something, I need to encourage it. To get excited with them. To ask questions together.
When they ask me all their “why?” questions, I will try not to shut them down, but instead listen, engage, and encourage further independent research. I don’t need to have all the answers to their questions. I do need to encourage them to keep looking for answers, and not throw water on their fire of curiosity with hasty, blank dismissals.

If I am truly busy and truly cannot help, I can either suggest we talk about it at a more opportune time, or give them some materials they can use to start researching independently. If I am busy but simply not wanting to be helpful because I’m in a hurry, I need to repent, give a thoughtful reply and/or encourage them to research.

I need to take the time to teach them skills. When Marcus wants to crack an egg. When Bri wants to tie her shoe. When Marcus wants to know how to spell a word. When Bri wants to help cook dinner.

When we go places and as we go about our work for the day, I try to notice more and help them notice more and tie it into whatever we are learning. We wonder. We ask questions.

When possible/appropriate I should include them in my interests and let them help/watch me.

Modeling (and Requiring) Diligence

My biggest temptation toward laziness during the day is to “cop out” for awhile and browse social media. The kids’ biggest temptation during our mornings is to grumble and complain about their schoolwork and chores.

GOALS:

Limit my time on social media and the internet in general. Do not look at my phone when the children are up/around except for necessary uses or quick checks (responding to certain texts, phone calls, calculator/bills, library orders, other orders, etc.). Spend more of my time in the afternoon on profitable things like reading and writing rather than internet browsing.

Guide the children into paths of faithfulness:

• Scriptural admonition (obedience/diligence/doing all we do for the glory of God)

• Common sense reasoning/big picture perspective (sound mind)

• Teach them to learn to enjoy work

• Fun has its place, but cannot usurp more important things

• Helping them recognize there are rewards to work (reaping and sowing)

• Delayed gratification

• Community/Family/Household dynamics (everyone is needed; we must all work together)

• Projects to encourage them to see and believe truth. Eventually they can keep Heart Journals, do word/Bible studies, etc.

• Discipline/Correction for whining, complaining, and laziness when appropriate

• Modeling faithfulness myself by not grumbling about my own responsibilities, and seeking repentance before God and them when I do.

• Being a present and loving mom. I need to give them my full attention when they are speaking to me or we are doing something together, to communicate that I love each one, to show no favoritism or partiality, and to spend time with them beyond school and chores.

Dealing with Irritations and Bad Attitudes

I am most likely to get irritable or shut down when I feel like my responsibilities just keep piling on me and I can’t complete them in my goal time. This is even more pronounced when the kids are whiny, rowdy, or needy simultaneously. Sometimes I complain when I’m tired.

GOALS:

When tempted to be irritable or complain I need to step back and assess things:

• Am I doing what I need to be doing RIGHT now?

• Can some things wait?

• Do other things need priority?

• Is everything on my agenda for the day even necessary?

• Is it possible to multi-task on some hings, get the kids’ help, etc.? (Work smarter and not harder?)

• Am I practicing good stewardship of my body? (Getting enough sleep and eating well so I don’t become moody/emotional?)

If everything absolutely must be done and I am still overwhelmed at the moment, I can back off, go into the bedroom for a few moments, pray, realign my focus, ask for grace, and consider the big picture.

When I feel the conviction of the Spirit, I can turn my heart to obedience rather than stubborness by taking a moment away. Acknowledge the struggle. Seek repentance before the Lord if I have complained or become irritable/angry (and before my children if needed). Go outside. Take a few moments for giving thanks.

If the kids’ attitudes and behaviors need tending to, I can first readjust mine, then help them with theirs. If I am unable to do that immediately I can send them off to do something for a little bit so I can regain composure and good attitude before trying to deal with theirs. It would be better to deal with their issues “late” than to deal with them in the heat of the moment while angry. Send them to complete a responsibility or to room but do not try to address the issues while I am angry.

I can help my children when they feel stubborn and want their own way by helping them to stop and see the big picture. By reminding them of truth. By helping them see that the good is desirable and right, and evil comes with consequences. I can give them time and space to think. To freely make a choice of obedience. When they fail to I can administer discipline if it is truly required.

Remember to determine if there may be underlying causes to the complaining that may need addressed first: Are they tired? Hungry? Not feeling well? Truly overwhelmed? Deal with each of these issues first.

Continued here

Gospel Alphabet

Feeling frustrated? Lonely? Disappointed? Anxious? Angry? Discouraged?

There are some days we just need to be reminded of who we are in Christ and what He has done for us in the gospel. I say there are “some days.” Actually we need this everyday–even on our best days! One of the best little books I ever read was A Gospel Primer for Christians by Milton Vincent. Vincent encourages the reader to recognize and savor the truths of the gospel as we see what they mean for us in a very real and practical sense in our day-to-day lives.

Once during a time of discouragement, my sister-in-law encouraged me to reflect on these truths again by making an alphabetical list of the many gifts God has bestowed on me through His gospel. The bolded words (at least most of them) are the ones I scratched onto a piece of paper and stuck in my Bible a long time ago:

A: I am Accepted in the Beloved, I’ve been Adopted, and I’ve been made Alive to God. When I sin, Christ is my Advocate before the Father.

B: I am Beloved in God. I have been Born again and am Blessed in Christ. He gives me Boldness to enter before God (Hebrews 10:19), and to do what is good (2 Timothy 1:7).

C: I am Chosen. I am also Chastened as a child for my good and God’s glory. I am being Conformed to the image of Christ!

D: I have been made Dead to sin!

E: The gift of Eternal life awaits me.

F: My God is always Faithful to me. He is my Father. I have been Forgiven.

G: Through the gospel, I have received Grace upon grace! I daily experience the Goodness of God. He gives me Guidance as I seek wisdom in His Word. Ultimately, the gospel offers not just the many Gifts, but the GiverGod Himself.

H: Christ is my spiritual Healing. God is my very present Help in trouble, and He has given me the gift of the Holy Spirit. He comforts me with eternal Hope.

I: I am promised an Inheritance with the saints! The Holy Spirit is my Intercessor, praying for me with groanings too deep for words (Romans 8:26).

J: JESUS is the center of my gospel hope! Regardless of the evil and injustice of this world, I know that God will render Justice for all His saints.

K: My Father is a King! God shows me His Kindness every day in a multitude of ways.

L: I know true Love in God. He is my Light. His Word is a Lamp to my feet.

M: God’s wrath has been turned away in Christ, and His Mercy freely poured out on me!

N: I am raised to New life—the old things are passed away and new things have come!

O: I have Obtained an inheritance with the saints. My Old man has died in Christ and I am a new creation.

P: I have been Purchased and Pardoned. God is my Provider and Protector.

Q: I am Qualified in Christ to enter the presence of God through His imputed righteousness (Matthew 22:11-14, Jude 24).

R: I am Redeemed and Rescued from sin. I am being Rooted in Christ, and one day I will Reign with Him.

S: I have been Saved from sin, Sealed with the Holy Spirit, and I am daily being Sanctified.

T: The Truth has been revealed to me and the Truth has set me free! I have been Transferred from the kingdom of darkness to the kingdom of light (Colossians 1:12-13).

U: When I am afraid, God promises me an Understanding-passing peace as I trust in Him and take Him all my troubles. In Christ we get to experience true Unity with other believers.

V: I have Victory in Jesus!

W: I am the Workmanship of Christ, and He is made Wisdom to me.

X: My life has been eXchanged for Χριστός!

Y: God has put within me a Yearning for His righteousness.

Z: There are ZERO charges laid against me—my account is clear in Christ!

Believer, what could you add to this list? 🙂

Dreams

We all have our own plans, dreams and desires.  Especially when we are young.  But we learn very quickly that life never goes exactly according to plan, and we are forced to grapple with realities that do not match our imagined idealisms.  This poem pictures the struggle of accepting disappointment, and learning to gain an eternal perspective as we learn to seek first Christ’s kingdom, rather than our own.

Weaving dreams and making plans,

The ethereal unfolds

In the mind where these stand—

Jewels of desire to behold.

Rich I deem myself to be,

I write my story page by page,

Charmed by lucid fantasy,

And passion of youthful age.

There are no words, and yet,

I know it all, I am so sure;

Dreams of light I’ll not forget,

As though encased in jasper.

On and on the music plays,

The siren song of passion;

Into my future I, smiling, gaze

In such a careless fashion.

Everything is bright and fair,

There is no dreary way,

A frown, a fret, a care—

These things will not play,

Not in my song of songs,

Nor in my visions sweet.

No dissonance or raucous gongs

Will bring desire to defeat.

But then one day—it happens;

From my pleasant dreams I wake.

I sit, awestruck, as passions

A restless roar within me make.

For there they are, my perfect dreams—

Stardust scattered o’er the ground.

The shattered bits flicker and gleam

But to an empty nothingness are bound.

Stepping round the ice cold shards

I survey the dismal scene.

It all came down, this house of cards—

A useless, empty fling.

Then looking up from this cruel turn

To the steel-gray heavens above,

I feel my heart within me burn

And wish for the wings of a dove;

That I might fly above all this—

Beyond the darkness into light

And find a true and steadfast solace,

A rescue from my night.

Pegasus and Scorpius

In their proud courses run;

The glory of great Sirius

Only pales by moon and sun.

Wind and water, waves and sea,

Salty breezes, frozen steppes,

Mighty mountains, ancient trees

And tiny robins in their nests—

All the glorious grandeur here

Of nature flashes through my vision,

As before my eyes appear

Scenes of serenity Elypsian.

Had I the wisdom of the ancients,

The knowledge of Archimedes,

The eloquence of Antony,

Precision of Thucydides…

I could not, with greatest effort

Express the magnitude and beauty

Of the great creation concert

In perfect harmony of key.

Then I ponder, “Who am I?

In all this vast expanse?

Just cells and atoms, nuclei?

Result of random chance?

A speck of nothing on a ball

Flung out in time and space?

Forgotten when I take a fall?

Obscure member of our race?”

No. No I know better.

I have met Him whose name is Truth;

His gift to me is no dead letter—

His Word a comfort from my youth.

This King who made the earth and heaven,

Who rules o’er land and sea,

He stoops so low to reckon

With man His creation…with me.

Not a sparrow falls before Him

But He sees and knows it all.

From His kindness does life stem;

Nothing for His interest is too small.

I am loved and known by Him,

And His promise is to me,

A cup with mercy filled to brim

For all eternity.

Center of the universe I’m not—

That place belongs to Christ.

For mankind’s freedom He has fought,

His sacrifice sufficed.

His kingdom interests are supreme,

They take priority o’er all

Man’s infinitesimal dreams

And plans so trivially small.

He’s working out His purposes

Planned from eternity;

He works all for our good, He says.

In Him we find identity.

Sometimes when all our hopes are dashed

And disappointment all we know,

When plans are swiftly crashed,

And for dreams we get a “No”…

A broken heart may be God’s gift

To raise our eyes to better sights;

The imaginations of our hearts to lift

To much fairer heights.

To break us free from minuscule visions,

To see His bigger scheme;

A greater good to envision,

As we embrace redemptive theme.

As I find comfort in this certainty,

The gray of sky is lifted.

The rays of sun break through to me

And warm my heart uplifted.

Then gather I the stardust bits

Of dreams and plans all broken;

To give an offering that fits,

A sacrifice of love—a token…

To the Lord who lived and died for me,

The God of my eternity.

The Fear of the Lord: To Please…or to Appease?

In my daily Bible reading this week, a story in 2 Kings 17 seemed to leap off the page at me. Some years ago I went through a time of being challenged by the concept of the fear of the Lord. How to understand, define, and embrace the biblical fear of the Lord in a culture that sees all fear as “bad”—this was the problem.

This story provides some very probing insights and raises thoughtful questions concerning our own understanding of the fear of God and what that looks like in our personal lives.

So here’s how it goes:

The king of Assyria captures Samaria and removes the Israelites (ten tribes) from their land, replacing them with men from other countries (Babylon, Cuthah, Ava, Hamath, and Sepharvaim). This is now a very mixed lot of men as far as religious beliefs are concerned; we’re talking quite the hodge-podge collection of idols—and a visit to Samaria would provide quite the multi-cultural experience. Despite their differences, they apparently manage to get on together just fine.

Then disaster strikes.

“And so it was at the beginning of their dwelling there, that they feared not the Lord: therefore the Lord sent lions among them, which slew some of them” (vs. 25).

This calls for action. The first thing they do is hit up the king who coordinated this poorly-planned relocation project: “Hey, we’ve got problems. We don’t know anything about the God of the land you’ve just dumped us in and apparently He’s not happy with us.”

The king, being the handy problem-solver that he is, snaps his fingers and says, “Don’t sweat it, I’ve got you covered. I’m sending one of the priests of the people I removed. He should know something about appeasing that strange God.”

Cool. They’ll wait. But in the meantime life insurance premiums are rising…

Soon after the Israelite priest arrives he teaches them “how they should fear the Lord” (vs. 28). What a relief. Now they can continue to safely worship their own gods while offering a sacrifice to the Israelite God now and then.

Because that’s exactly what they do.

So they feared the Lord, and made unto themselves of the lowest of them priests of the high places, which sacrificed for them in the houses of the high places. They feared the Lord, and served their own gods… (vvs. 32-33).

Talk about syncretism. These people are literally offering sacrifices to God while burning their children in fire to Adrammalech and Anammalech (vvs. 29-31)!

So that’s the puzzling story of the settlers of Samaria. But what appears to be a contradiction arises in this passage. Verse 34 tells us “Unto this day they do after the former manners: they fear not the Lord…” and verse 41 says “So these nations feared the Lord, and served their graven images…so do they unto this day.”

They “fear not” the Lord to this day. And they “feared” the Lord to this day.

Isn’t this a contradiction?

Not if we’re talking about two very different kinds of fear.

These people had a good case of the collywobbles: a knock-kneed, pee-your-pants paranoia of a powerful God of wrath. They had no desire to know Him or please Him, they simply wanted to appease Him. They knew He was big. They knew He was powerful. They had no intention of actually serving Him, but He was scary to them so they needed to find some way to appease this foreign Deity. Ordaining a paltry handful of low-life characters from the seedy side of town to go through the motions of offering a few meaningless sacrifices to this burdensome but nevertheless scary God—that would do the trick.

Like a charm…which was literally all they were looking for: a charm to “keep the spirits away.” And lions. Lions too.

And that was the extent of their “fear” of God.

Solomon tells us that the biblical fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom. Proverbs 8:13 says, “The fear of the Lord is to hate evil…” To hate sin and turn from it is the fear of the Lord. Those who fear the Lord are exhorted to trust in the Lord: these two things (fear and trust) are not considered mutually incompatible, but rather complimentary when taken in their biblical sense (Psalm 115:11). The biblical fear of God actually frees us from the fear of man and circumstance—destructive fears in our lives.

Many have a fear of God that is not biblical. Because they entertain a “fear” of Him that does not engender faith and trust in Him, they seek to reform some of their actions or to offer Him some vestiges of “service” in order to “appease” Him, so that they might continue on with their lives as they see fit. Or they may be genuinely “scared” of God, and feel that they cannot approach Him, but it’s the wrong kind of fear altogether and does not produce the fruit of holiness in their lives.

Those who fear the Lord with a biblical fear delight in Him, trust Him, and seek to please, not appease Him. They are not paranoid of the wrath of God: they know that’s been satisfied in Christ, having already been poured out on Him. They know God is big and not One to be trifled with, and they serve Him in reverence (see Hebrews 12:28-29, 1 Peter 1:13-21). But their fear of God draws them closer to Him, rather than pushing them away from Him into a corner where they cower in the shadows, afraid to approach Him. I’ve come to believe that this is the defining difference between a biblical fear of the Lord and its fraudulent counterpart.

In a world where people are awakening to the widespread reality of the fear and abuse that many individuals in destructive relationships experience everyday, the very concept of the “fear of the Lord” has gained a bad rap. God is a God of love. Why would He want us to fear Him? Isn’t that abusive and legalistic?

The problem is that our concept of fear is often viewed through broken, twisted, human experience—or knowledge of human experience. When a man seeks to abusively control his wife or children he employs fear to scare them into bowing to his will. He controls them with it. The fear they have for him is not a reverent one. They do not willingly submit to him because they respect and love him; they submit because (for the moment at least) he’s bigger and stronger—and meaner—than they are.

This is a fear from hell, not from God; it’s not the kind of fear He seeks from His people. He seeks a love that is characterized by deep reverence for Who He is: He’s not a teddy bear, a “pet,” or a grandfather figure handing out candy; He’s the holy God of the Universe. C. S. Lewis had it right:

lion-3040797_1920

“Aslan is a lion—the Lion, the great Lion.”

“Ooh,” said Susan. “I’d thought he was a man. Is he—quite safe? I shall feel rather nervous about meeting a lion.”

“Safe?” said Mr. Beaver. “Who said anything about safe? ‘Course he isn’t safe. But he’s good. He’s the king, I tell you.”

—The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Do we love and reverence this great King, this Lion of the tribe of Judah? Does our fear of Him cause us to draw near Him or to shy away from Him? Does it cause us to walk in holiness or to begrudgingly go through the motions of religion? Do we seek to please Him or to feel we must appease Him? Do we trust Him and find our peace and joy in Him, or do we cower like a beggar in His presence? When we are in sin, does our fear of Him lead us to repentance or to sulk in perpetual guilt?

The nations inhabiting Samaria feared God with a disdainful, irreverent, cowardly fear. They did not fear Him with a biblical fear. Their fear was the same kind of fear enemies—not friends—of a king may have.

Does our fear of God more resemble that of the heathens, or of His own dear children for whom He sent His Son to suffer and die?

Truth is a Person

This is an edited article I originally wrote and posted July 15, 2015

“What is truth?”

This was Pontius Pilate’s question to Jesus.

Don’t we all encounter this question in our lives? In a world where everyone alternately claims to have the truth or that there is no such thing as truth, does it exist and can we really know what it is?

That’s a question I’ve been asked before. With so many conflicting opinions and beliefs, is there any objective way to know and define truth?

Some believe that truth is everything. Everything is truth, everyone is “right.”

Although every religion claims to have the “truth,” each embraces teachings that contradict every other religion’s beliefs. When opinions clash, philosophies disagree, and beliefs part ways, everything and everyone cannot be completely “right.”

Others have decided that truth is nothing. Nothing is truth. Truth cannot be known. It is an exercise in futility to try to seek it out.

A Man entered this world 2,000 years ago Who claimed to BE Truth. Jesus Christ said, “I am the Way, THE TRUTH, and the Life; no man cometh unto the Father but by Me” (John 14:6).

This was a watershed moment in the history of mankind.

But even as believers who are indwelt by THE TRUTH, we often find ourselves confused about truth. One look at the many different sects, denominations, and doctrines within the broad spectrum of Christianity itself would seem to contradict the assertion that
truth can be known. Many little groups, sects, or cults within the church claim they have all truth and all the others are wrong. We speak of truth as if it was a personal possession—something we have mastered and now own with exclusivism.

I am from a conservative background. Growing up, my family was heavily influenced by the teachings of one man and his ministry. Speaking from my side of the aisle, I am familiar with many of the movements within the conservative Christian community and the groups that spawned from them, and I’ve realized that many of us (myself included) have been lured by the mindset that one group, or one denomination, or one teacher, or even one movement for that matter, held all the truth.

Whether we’re being offered the Christian life in a package, doctrine in a box, or theology in a catechism, it’s all the same thing. Someone, some group, some theological or lifestyle persuasion, or some church has ALL truth (or at least more of it than anyone else),
and if you want to get a piece of it, listen to him/it/them. Take it all. Join the club. Because the more you take the more “right” you are and the more truth you have.

But truth is not the private, patented property of any man or any creed.

Truth is a Person.

It is the Lamb of God, the Savior of the world, the Word, Who is full of grace and truth (see John 1:14-18). The “truth is in Jesus” (Ephesians 4:21).

Truth is absolute and immutable. It does not change, just as Jesus does not change, but is “the same yesterday, and today, and forever” (Hebrews 13:8). What we know about it has been manifested to us through Christ, Who is our wisdom, our righteousness, our
sanctification, and our redemption (see 1 Corinthians 1:30). And He has chosen to reveal Himself in His Word, which is truth (see John 17:17), all Scripture pointing to Christ, Who is Ultimate Truth.

In my daily Bible reading one morning, I was in the book of 1st Corinthians and noticed, in the first four chapters, that Paul was addressing similar issues and attitudes in the Corinthian church that we struggle with today as he rebuked them for their petty sectarianism: “For while one saith, I am of Paul; and another, I am of Apollos; are ye not
carnal?” (1 Corinthians 3:4).

He repeatedly emphasized that spiritual things are spiritually discerned; that every believer has the mind of Christ. Truth, wisdom, righteousness—these things did not belong to any one man (or church). Paul instructed them, “Therefore let no man glory in men. For all things are yours; Whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, or the world, or life, or death, or things present, or things to come; all are yours; And ye are Christ’s; and Christ is God’s” (1 Corinthians 3:21-23).

Christ is ours. Truth lives within us. Our desire should be to know Him intimately.  The more we learn of Him, the more we learn of Truth. His Word is a tool to that end. It can give us knowledge and direction (2 Timothy 3:16-17), and the Holy Spirit has been given to us to illuminate it for us (John 14:26). It is our responsibility to carefully study and rightly divide it (2 Timothy 2:15), to examine all things carefully, and hold fast that which is good (1 Thessalonians 5:21; see also Proverbs 23:23).

Is there such a thing as absolute Truth?

Absolutely.

Is it the sole, private property of any one man, group, or church?

Absolutely not.

Truth can be known and obeyed.  Pilate foolishly failed to wait for an answer to his own question.  He wasn’t truly seeking truth.  But it is there, and those who seek will find.

But even as we pursue truth, we need the wisdom and humility to see that none of us has perfect knowledge, perfect understanding, perfect doctrine (ouch! I so wish I did!), and certainly not perfect obedience. The Word is perfect. Our interpretation of it is never going to be completely perfect in everything. No one and no church among us has “got it all.” We have Christ, the Word, and the Holy Spirit. In that sense, as believers we share all there is to share. We will always have to grow, be challenged, be stretched, and therefore be open to correction.

There are two practical points to this: first, we must pursue knowledge and truth in the context of pursuing intimate fellowship and a rich relationship with Christ. Richard
Wurmbrand has said that Christ is the Truth, Scripture is the truth about the Truth, and theology is the truth about the truth about the Truth. Unfortunately, it’s possible to pursue theology and the study of the Word without actively pursuing Christ Himself. The result—if it even leads to the discovery of truth—will be truth without love.

Second, we need a humble open-mindedness to accept correction and instruction from other believers. Christ has placed His children within the community of the church. We need
one another. If we foolishly believe we (or our church) have arrived at all truth, we will not be open to the perspective and insight of other fellow believers. We will lose opportunities to
grow and be stretched and challenged.

The search for truth and a following after it is a life-long pursuit. No doctrine-in-a-box stuff can replace a growing relationship with the One all biblical doctrine points to. Joining
the “perfect” group or church denomination will not cause us to “possess” more truth than
anyone else. Learning from Christian teachers cannot replace learning at the feet of Christ. And we should never use neatly-packaged Christian-life-in-a-box teachings to relieve us of the
responsibility we each have personally before God to study His Word, get to know His Son, and grow in what pleases Him.

Because Truth is not a creed, a catechism, a membership, or a lifestyle list of do’s and don’ts.

Truth is a Person.

God’s Placement

Note: This is a guest post from my husband, Cliff.  It was originally posted on September 22, 2013

The exact placement of the sun and earth reveals that if the earth were too close or far away from the sun, life would be impossible. The temperatures would either be too frigid or too hot for any life to exist. The margin for error is too small for this to have been left to chance.

But what does this teach about God?

It reflects a God that leaves nothing to chance. He is far too smart for that. He, being all-wise, knew the exact parameters needed for life to exist on the earth, therefore our solar system is ordered in excruciating exactness.  This also reveals a thoughtful God who lovingly cares for and protects His creation.

 With this in view, spiritually God also thoughtfully places the believer and arranges his life so that he or she can grow to the fullest. Nothing has been left to chance. Despite the devil’s numerous attempts to pollute the Bible, He kept His word pure and holy, and it exclaims that God has given “…all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge of him that hath called us to glory and virtue,” II Peter 1:3.
Seeing this, life for a believer does not have to be intermittent and feeble, for the things necessary for spiritual vitality are not too far away for us. His word is not only in heaven, but is with us.
He has even placed us in Christ, I Corinthians 1:2. In Christ there can be no better protection from the effects of sin and its power. As sin never overpowered Christ, then so we that walk with Him will not be overcome by its power and thereby sin, Galatians 5:16. The sinning serpent bruised Christ’s heel, but Christ crushed his head, Genesis 3:15.
Our Lord is all-powerful. There is nothing that can separate us from the Love of God in Christ Jesus, Romans 8:39. He bore the punishment, that we might not have to. Because you are in Him, He is your Protection. We overcome because He overcame.

As God knows all, is all-powerful, Loving, and Sovereign, He can and does work all things for good to them that love Him, Romans 8:28. Here again, the Father leaves nothing to chance for His children. He wisely and lovingly orders our lives. Perhaps relationships which we thought were good, He removes, for they would turn our hearts from Him.  We also experience His physical protection.  When you would take a step off the scaffold (and break bones!), He intervenes by having you look down and stop before you crumple in a heap.
On the other hand, the chastisement God bestows upon us turns us back to Him, Hebrews 12:11.
In short, the placement of the believer is perfect in God’s will. Without these things, the Christian life would be utterly impossible.